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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/12574
Title: Carbon (1s) NEXAFS spectra of biogeochemically relevant reference organic compounds
Authors: Solomon, Dawit
Lehmann, Johannes
Keywords: soils
carbon
organic matter
NEXAFS
soil organic matter
carbon cycle
Issue Date: 5-May-2009
Abstract: Natural organic matter (NOM) is a significant and active component in soils and sediments and plays an important role in carbon cycling. This data set provides a library of carbon (1s) near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of biogeochemically relevant reference organic compounds. These spectral features can be used to derive structural information and determine peak assignment criteria to aid in the identification of complex organic carbon compounds in environmental samples. Comprehensive information on this research is presented in the following publication: Solomon, Dawit, Johannes Lehmann, James Kinyangi, Biqing Liang, Karen Heymann, Lena Dathe, Kelly Hanley, Sue Wirick, and Chris Jacobsen. 2009 (In press: vol. 73). Carbon (1s) NEXAFS spectroscopy of biogeochemically relevant reference organic compounds. Soil Science Society of America Journal.
Description: This data package must be uncompressed for use. In addition to the data described above, it includes an Ecological Metadata Language (EML) record, which describes in considerable detail the contents of the data table(s), methods, usage rights, and other information. All users of these data are strongly encouraged to review this EML record.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/12574
Appears in Collections:AEEP Data sets

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