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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/28255
Title: Polytrauma-induced coagulopathy in an American Staffordshire Terrier
Authors: Padte, Ravee
Keywords: Dogs -- Diseases -- Treatment -- Case studies
Dogs -- Wounds and injuries -- Case studies
Issue Date: 12-Oct-2011
Series/Report no.: Senior seminar paper
Seminar SF610.1 2012
Abstract: An 11-year-old spayed female American Stafforshire Terrier was presented to the Emergency Service at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals for bite wounds. At presentation, the patient was in hypovolemic shock and respiratory distress. She had multiple bite wounds over her thorax and left forelimb. Comprehensive blood work revealed anemia, hypoproteinemia, respiratory and metabolic acidosis, hyperlactatemia, leukopenia, elevated muscle enzymes, and decrease colloid osmotic pressure. Initial stabilization included fluid therapy with crystalloids and colloids, supplemental oxygen, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and pain management. The patient was taken to surgery for wound exploration and repair. Post-operative complictions included persistent anemia, hypoproteinemia, prolonged coagulation times, ventricular arrhythmias, and hypotension. Additional therapies included transfusions of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and human 25% albumin. The patient ultimately succumbed to respiratory and cardiac arrest. This case documents the development of a coagulopathy in a traumatized canine patient and sheds light on the multifactorial nature of trauma-induced coagulopathy.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/28255
Appears in Collections:Senior Seminars

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