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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29279
Title: A Longitudinal Examination Of Outcomes Of Teen Dating Violence Victimization
Authors: Exner, Deinera
Keywords: Teen dating violence
Adverse outcomes
Issue Date: 31-Jan-2011
Abstract: Teen dating violence (TDV), the physical, sexual or psychological violence that occurs within the context of heterosexual or same-sex dating relationships, is a substantial public health problem in the United States. While the association of TDV victimization with adverse outcomes is documented in a number of cross-sectional studies, longitudinal work on this topic is limited. The present study examined the association of TDV with a broad range of adverse outcomes 5 years postvictimization, using the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n=5,681). Physical and psychological TDV victimization were assessed at Wave 2 when participants were in grades 8-12, and adverse outcomes were assessed approximately 5 years later (Wave 3), when participants were aged 18-27. Outcomes explored in this study included substance use (smoking, heavy episodic drinking, marijuana use and other drug use), sexual risk, depression, self-esteem, adult intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, suicidal behaviors (attempts and ideation), antisocial behaviors and extreme weight control behaviors. Data were analyzed using multivariate linear and logistic regression models. Compared to participants reporting no TDV at Wave 2, participants reporting Wave 2 TDV victimization had increased rates of depression, other drug use, heavy episodic drinking, antisocial behaviors, suicidal ideation and IPV victimization at Wave 3, when controlling for race, age, socioeconomic status, child maltreatment, pubertal status and gender. We also considered results for the subset of victims experiencing psychological aggression only and for the subset of victims experiencing both physical and psychological aggression. In the psychological aggression subgroup, Wave 2 victimization was related to substance use, antisocial behaviors, suicidal ideation and IPV victimization at Wave 3, while in the subset of individuals experiencing both physical and psychological aggression at Wave 2, victimization was related to increased Wave 3 smoking, IPV victimization, suicidal ideation and depression. In gender-stratified analyses, we found that Wave 2 psychological victimization was related to Wave 3 marijuana use, antisocial behaviors, suicidal ideation and IPV victimization in males, while for females in this sub-group, Wave 2 victimization was only related to Wave 3 heavy episodic drinking and IPV victimization. For females experiencing both physical and psychological aggression at Wave 2, victimization was related to increased Wave 3 smoking, depression, suicidal ideation and IPV victimization; for males in this subgroup, Wave 2 victimization was only related to increased Wave 3 IPV victimization. The results from the present analyses suggest that TDV victimization during adolescence is related to adverse outcomes in both males and females 5 years after victimization. These findings also imply that certain outcomes may be more strongly related to certain sub-types of TDV, and that this relationship may differ by gender. Results are discussed in terms of directionality of adverse effects, and within the context of a stress and coping framework. Findings from this study can be used to improve secondary prevention programs offered to victims of TDV. ii
Committee Chair: Eckenrode, John Joseph
Committee Member: Schrader, Dawn Ellen
Rothman, Emily F
Discipline: Developmental Psychology
Degree Name: M.A. of Developmental Psychology
Degree Level: Master of Arts
Degree Grantor: Cornell University
No Access Until: 2016-06-01
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29279
Appears in Collections:Theses and Dissertations (CLOSED)

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