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Hydrologic Discovery Through Physical Analysis Honoring the Scientific Legacies of Wilfried H. Brutsaert and Jean-Yves Parlange >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29568
Title: F3. Regional Evaporation Using Atmospheric Boundary Layer Profiles (a.k.a Brutsaert’s Balloons)
Authors: Kustas, William P.
Keywords: Regional Evaporation
Atmospheric Boundary Layer
Monin-Obukhov Similarity
Issue Date: May-2012
Publisher: Internet-First University Press
Abstract: Land surface temperature (LST) from thermal remote sensing is a surface boundary condition that is strongly linked to the partitioning of the available energy between latent (evapotranspiration) and sensible heat flux. Numerous modeling approaches have been developed ranging in level of complexity from semi-empirical to numerically-based soil-vegetation-atmosphere schemes. Many of the approaches require an accurate LST because the heat fluxes are related to the surface-air temperature differences. There is also difficulty estimating appropriate exchange coefficients for heterogeneous landscapes having a mixture of soil and vegetation temperatures influencing the LST observation and associated aerodynamic temperature. For regional applications this also means requiring an accurate air temperature distribution over the area of interest. These requirements have rendered many of the modeling approaches unusable for routine applications over complex land surfaces. However a two-source energy balance (TSEB) modeling scheme using time differencing in LST observations coupled to an atmospheric boundary layer growth model has been developed to adequately address the major impediments to the application of LST in large scale evapotranspiration determination. The modeling system, Atmospheric Land EXchange Inverse (ALEXI), using geostationary LST observations and the disaggregation methodology (DisALEXI) together with data fusion techniques will be described. This modeling system is currently providing regional and continental scale evapotranspiration estimates in the U.S. and plans are to develop a global product.
Description: Once downloaded, these high definition QuickTime videos may be played using a computer video player with H.264 codec, 1280x720 pixels, millions of colors, AAC audio at 44100Hz and 29.97 frames per second. The data rate is 5Mbps. File sizes are on the order of 600-900 MB. (Other formats may be added later.) Free QuickTime players for Macintosh and Window computers may be located using a Google search on QuickTime. The DVD was produced by J. Robert Cooke.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29568
Appears in Collections:Hydrologic Discovery - Oral Presentations (Videos)

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streaming_29568.htmlView Streaming Video8.24 kBHTMLView/Open
F3_Kustas_SLIDES.pdfPDF of slides used in the lecture28.81 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
F3_Kustas_Evaporation_SD_for_Apple_Devices.m4vDownload small version of Video129.57 MBM4v VideoView/Open
F3_Kustas_Evaporation-HD_for_Apple_Devices_5Mbps.m4vDownload HD Video for Apple Devices409.93 MBM4v VideoView/Open

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